Generator Rentals and Rental Rates

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Arizona Generator Rentals offers reliable power, ranging from 20 ekW to 2000 ekW, so you get the right power at the right time. Our rental generator sets were engineered for easy transporting and fast installation — rebuild after a disaster, power maintenance machinery or a project, keep a standby power supply or produce energy for seasonal peak loads. Designed to work alone or in redundancy, they’re guaranteed to meet your greatest power need in the shortest time.

To ensure our generator’s rental performance and reliability, we employ a comprehensive maintenance program to make sure our rental sprayers are rent ready for your job. We pride ourselves on providing a wide variety of safe, reliable rental sprayers to meet your needs. We have competitive sprayer rental rates. Whether it’s temporary projects or long term jobs, we have just what you need.

Customer service is what drives us. It started with equipment rentals and it continues today with all of our transportation solutions. At Team Rental, our dedicated and knowledgeable employees will work alongside you to ensure you get the right trailer for your needs with the service you have come to expect from Team. Come see how we’ll go the extra mile for you.

Our rental fleet is inspected by our highly trained service department with regularly scheduled maintenance procedures to assure safe, reliable, productive machinery. We carry excavators, wheel loaders, loader backhoes, tractor loaders, mini excavators, skidsteer loaders, motor graders, hydraulic hammers, compactors, water trucks and trailers, tractors, trench rollers, telehandlers and much more for rent right here in Tucson, Arizona. Use our Contact Us form to reserve your rental unit. We will strive to provide the equipment you need to get your job done right. 

Call or email us to rent from our diversified rental inventory featuring trucks and excavator rentals, wheel loader, backhoe, tractor, skidsteer, motorgrader, compactor, trailer, trench roller and many hydraulic hammer models and sizes. Our equipment rental rates provide value and be market competitive. Delivery and pickup from our Arizona dealership is also offered for your convenience with competitive rates. We serve Arizona with quality and dependable Rental Construction, Industrial and Farm Equipment.

Team Equipment Rentals has been oriented to serving and fulfilling the needs of our customers with quality rental equipment, implements, tractors, parts, and other necessities at the best prices possible with great service. Our Service sets us apart from the competition and our wide array of products and brands allows Team Equipment Rentals to offer the best products. Team also has packages for renting for longer periods of time, offering Rental to Own options or Leases and offer affordable equipment for sale.

Team Equipment Rentals offers generator rentals in many areas of Arizona including rentals in Apache Junction, Avondale, Benson, Bisbee, Buckeye, Bullhead City, Camp Verde, Carefree, Casa Grande, Cave Creek, Chandler, Chino Valley, Clarkdale, Clifton, Colorado City, Coolidge, Cottonwood, Dewey-Humboldt, Douglas, Duncan, Eagar, El Mirage, Eloy, Flagstaff, Florence, Fountain Hills, Fredonia, Gila Bend, Gilbert, Glendale, Globe, Goodyear, Guadalupe, Hayden, Holbrook, Huachuca City, Jerome, Kearny, Kingman, Lake Havasu City, Litchfield Park, Mammoth, Marana, Maricopa, Mesa, Miami, Nogales, Oro Valley, Page, Paradise Valley, Parker, Patagonia, Payson, Peoria, Phoenix, Pima, Pinetop-Lakeside, Prescott Valley, Prescott, Quartzsite, Queen Creek, Safford, Sahuarita, San Luis, Scottsdale, Sedona, Show Low, Sierra Vista, Snowflake, Somerton, South Tucson, Springerville, St. Johns, Star Valley, Superior, Surprise, Taylor, Tempe, Thatcher, Tolleson, Tombstone, Tucson, Tusayan, Wellton, Wickenburg, Willcox, Williams, Winkelman, Winslow, Youngtown, and Yuma Arizona.

We have full service road service trucks and shops that keep all equipment running smoothly. Our mechanics have been working in the field for over 20 years and are experienced to handle concerns that arise from the daily use of rental equipment. We also deliver equipment everywhere to your location.

About Generators

In electricity generation, a generator[1] is a device that converts motive power into electrical power for use in an external circuit. Sources of mechanical energy include steam turbines, gas turbines, water turbines, internal combustion engines and even hand cranks. The first electromagnetic generator, the Faraday disk, was built in 1831 by British scientist Michael Faraday. Generators provide nearly all of the power for electric power grids.

The reverse conversion of electrical energy into mechanical energy is done by an electric motor, and motors and generators have many similarities. Many motors can be mechanically driven to generate electricity and frequently make acceptable manual generators.

Electromagnetic generators fall into one of two broad categories, dynamos and alternators.

Dynamos generate pulsing direct current through the use of a commutator

Alternators generate alternating current

Mechanically a generator consists of a rotating part and a stationary part

Rotor: The rotating part of an electrical machine

Stator: The stationary part of an electrical machine, which surrounds the rotor

One of these parts generates a magnetic field, the other has a wire winding in which the changing field induces an electric current

Field winding or field magnet: The magnetic field producing component of an electrical machine. The magnetic field of the dynamo or alternator can be provided by either wire windings called field coils or permanent magnets. A generator using permanent magnets is sometimes called a magneto.

Armature: The power-producing component of an electrical machine. In a generator, alternator, or dynamo the armature windings generate the electric current, which provides power to an external circuit.

The armature can be on either the rotor or the stator, depending on the design, with the field coil or magnet on the other part.

Through a series of discoveries, the dynamo was succeeded by many later inventions, especially the AC alternator, which was capable of generating alternating current.

Alternating current generating systems were known in simple forms from Michael Faraday's original discovery of the magnetic induction of electric current. Faraday himself built an early alternator. His machine was a "rotating rectangle", whose operation was heteropolar - each active conductor passed successively through regions where the magnetic field was in opposite directions.[9]

Large two-phase alternating current generators were built by a British electrician, J.E.H. Gordon, in 1882. The first public demonstration of an "alternator system" was given by William Stanley, Jr., an employee of Westinghouse Electric in 1886.[10]

Sebastian Ziani de Ferranti established Ferranti, Thompson and Ince in 1882, to market his Ferranti-Thompson Alternator, invented with the help of renowned physicist Lord Kelvin.[11] His early alternators produced frequencies between 100 and 300 Hz. Ferranti went on to design the Deptford Power Station for the London Electric Supply Corporation in 1887 using an alternating current system. On its completion in 1891, it was the first truly modern power station, supplying high-voltage AC power that was then "stepped down" for consumer use on each street. This basic system remains in use today around the world.

A small early 1900s 75 kVA direct-driven power station AC alternator, with a separate belt-driven exciter generator.

After 1891, polyphase alternators were introduced to supply currents of multiple differing phases.[12] Later alternators were designed for varying alternating-current frequencies between sixteen and about one hundred hertz, for use with arc lighting, incandescent lighting and electric motors.[13]

As the requirements for larger scale power generation increased, a new limitation rose: the magnetic fields available from permanent magnets. Diverting a small amount of the power generated by the generator to an electromagnetic field coil allowed the generator to produce substantially more power. This concept was dubbed self-excitation.

The field coils are connected in series or parallel with the armature winding. When the generator first starts to turn, the small amount of remanent magnetism present in the iron core provides a magnetic field to get it started, generating a small current in the armature. This flows through the field coils, creating a larger magnetic field which generates a larger armature current. This "bootstrap" process continues until the magnetic field in the core levels off due to saturation and the generator reaches a steady state power output.

Very large power station generators often utilize a separate smaller generator to excite the field coils of the larger. In the event of a severe widespread power outage where islanding of power stations has occurred, the stations may need to perform a black start to excite the fields of their largest generators, in order to restore customer power service.[14]

 

References

 ^ Also called electric generator, electrical generator, and electromagnetic generator.

 ^ Augustus Heller (2 April 1896), "Anianus Jedlik", Nature, Norman Lockyer, 53 (1379): 516, Bibcode:1896Natur..53..516H, doi:10.1038/053516a0

 ^ Birmingham Museums trust catalogue, accession number: 1889S00044

 ^ Thomas, John Meurig (1991). Michael Faraday and the Royal Institution: The Genius of Man and Place. Bristol: Hilger. p. 51. ISBN 0750301457.

 ^ Beauchamp, K G (1997). Exhibiting Electricity. IET. p. 90. ISBN 9780852968956.

 ^ Hunt, L. B. (March 1973). "The early history of gold plating". Gold Bulletin. 6 (1): 16–27. doi:10.1007/BF03215178.

 ^ Berliner Berichte. January 1867. Missing or empty |title= (help)

 ^ Proceedings of the Royal Society. February 14, 1867. Missing or empty |title= (help)

 ^ Thompson, Sylvanus P., Dynamo-Electric Machinery. pp. 7

 ^ Blalock, Thomas J., "Alternating Current Electrification, 1886". IEEE History Center, IEEE Milestone. (ed. first practical demonstration of a dc generator - ac transformer system.)

 ^ Ferranti Timeline Archived October 3, 2015, at the Wayback Machine. – Museum of Science and Industry (Accessed 22-02-2012)

 ^ Thompson, Sylvanus P., Dynamo-Electric Machinery. pp. 17

 ^ Thompson, Sylvanus P., Dynamo-Electric Machinery. pp. 16

 ^ SpecSizer: Generator Set Sizing

 ^ Losty, H.H.W & Lewis, D.L. (1973) Homopolar Machines. Philosophical Transactions for the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. 275 (1248), 69-75

 ^ Langdon Crane, Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Power Generator: More Energy from Less Fuel, Issue Brief Number IB74057, Library of Congress Congressional Research Service, 1981, retrieved from Digital.library.unt.edu 18 July 2008

 ^ "Hurricane Preparedness: Protection Provided by Power Generators | Power On with Mark Lum". Wpowerproducts.com. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 2012-08-24.

 ^ With Generators Gone, Wall Street Protesters Try Bicycle Power, Colin Moynihan, New York Times, 30 October 2011; accessed 2 November 2011

 ^ "Program: hpv (updated 6/22/11)". Ohio.edu. Retrieved 2012-08-24.

 ^ Geoff Klempner, Isidor Kerszenbaum, "1.7.4 Equivalent circuit", Handbook of Large Turbo-Generator Operation and Maintenance, John Wiley & Sons, 2011 (Kindle edition) ISBN 1118210409.

 ^ Yoshihide Hase, "10: Theory of generators", Handbook of Power System Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, 2007 ISBN 0470033665.

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